Posts Tagged ‘arlington wa’

Harmony Massage promotional video; Myo Movement Integration Therapy

September 22, 2014

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Byg_IwTAh_s

Andrew Wolfe,LMP owner of Harmony Licensed Massage therapy and founder of the massage technique “Myo movement integration therapy,” demonstrates his techniques and treatment protocol for injury and rehabilitation of auto, sports, work and personal injuries, with the use of myofascial release therapy, manual traction,
trigger point, joint mobilization, remedial massage therapy and stretching, which incorporates self empowerment tools and skills to allow the patient to become personally empowered.

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Map and routing source code; Cyle business directory

August 11, 2011

Map and routing to us

>Medical Massage and Insurance Coverage by Andrew Wolfe,LMP

May 26, 2011

>Medical Massage and Insurance Coverage by Andrew Wolfe,LMP: “Andrew Wolfe,LMP of Harmony Licensed Massage Therapy,presents ‘Medical Massage and Insurance Coverage’.Medical insurance and Labor & Industry provider of medical massage he offers 24 years of full time clinical expereince in his practice with insight in the field of massage therapy in regards to rehabilitation through medical massage.www.harmonymassagetherapy.com”

Andrew Wolfe, Arlington, 98223, 98223-8515, 98270, 98271 | Find Massage Therapist

May 23, 2011

Andrew Wolfe, Arlington, 98223, 98223-8515, 98270, 98271 | Find Massage Therapist.

Slide show; medical based massage therapy;Harmony Licensed massage Therapy

May 10, 2011

http://www.medicalmingle.com/harmonylicensedmassagetherapy/gallery/slideshow.swf

Andrew Wolfe,LMP

Slide show Andrew Wolfe,LMP

May 6, 2011

<table cellspacing=”0″ cellpadding=”0″ border=”0″ bgcolor=”#ffffff”><tr><td><a href=”http://smilebox.com/play/4d6a51314d444d354e7a553d0d0a&blogview=true&campaign=blog_playback_link” target=”_blank”><img width=”386″ height=”303″ alt=”Click to play this Smilebox collage” src=”http://smilebox.com/snap/4d6a51314d444d354e7a553d0d0a.jpg” style=”border: medium none ;”/></a></td></tr><tr><td><a href=”http://www.smilebox.com/?partner=msn&campaign=blog_snapshot” target=”_blank”><img width=”386″ height=”46″ alt=”Create your own collage – Powered by Smilebox” src=”http://www.smilebox.com/globalImages/blogInstructions/blogLogoSmileboxSmall.gif” style=”border: medium none ;”/></a></td></tr><tr><td align=”center”>This <a href=”http://www.smilebox.com/collages.html” target=”_blank”>picture collage</a> customized with Smilebox</td></tr></table>

>Slide show Andrew Wolfe,LMP

May 6, 2011

>

Click to play this Smilebox collage
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Thank you for the community support;KRKO “Health Matters” airing 4/25/11.

April 28, 2011

http://www.harmonymassagetherapy.com/Harmony-Massage-Media.html

I want to thank all of those listeners who supported me by tuning into the segment of “Health Matters”. It aired yesterday evening, April 25th at 6:45 PM, PST on Everett Washington’s radio station, KRKO 1380 AM. A special thank you for my hosts Maury Eskenazi and Shannon O Kelly.

To recap points that were made on the show; The difference between medical massage and spa or relaxation massage, is the intension of outcome , the use of specific protocol and a treatment plan with a focus on an injured area, verse a full body generalized approach.

Another point made was made, in defining what myofascial release therapy is. Myofascial release therapy is a deep tissue massage techniques used to correct and restore tissue and their surrounding structures. Other techniques used are deep tissue massage, manual traction which help with decompression of the spine and joint as well as surrounding tissues, remedial movement and somatic movement.

The description of the muscular system was explained in that, this system is not just composed of muscles but includes connective tissue, fascia, tendons and ligaments.

Also defining medical massage therapy as being broader in the areas of treatment and not limited in the areas of the back and neck or for just relieving sprain and strains. Conditions such as whiplash, fibromyalgia, carpal tunnel, thoracic outlet syndrome and plantar fasciits can be treated. As long as there is fascia and other connective tissue, any area can be treated with medical massage therapy.

The question was presented about how do people come to me. I responded by stating that patients come to me by a referring doctor or specialist. When asked about how often do they come, my response was based on what is prescribed in a treatment plan, such as once or twice a week for 6 weeks or as indicated as medically needed.

An inquiry was also made about what kinds of specific conditions that I work with that are effective with myofascial release. I explained that fibromyalgia is one condition I treat in addressing the fascia, which is the layer within the muscular system that binds and holds everything together. This is a common disorder of the fascia. When in the case of working with a patient with fibromyagia their fascia is thick similar to glue. Myofascial release helps to remove this thickness in the fascia by given it length.

Other conditions I treat were also addressed. Car accident, L&I injuries, sports injuries and post operative pain following surgery are some of the types of generalized health concerns an individual would have in seeking out my services.

This is a brief outline of the interview. Thank you again for your support. It is my intension to educated the benefits of massage therapy in the health care community as a natural and effective technique for rehabilitation.

Copyright Andrew Wolfe, LMP 4/25/2011

http://www.harmonymassagetherapy.com/Harmony-Massage-Media.html

The Importance of Individualized Health Care by Andrew Wolfe,LMP

April 22, 2011

Leg flexion and low back massage by Andrew Wolfe,LMP

Health care these days is a system of managed care. Due to the volume of patients needs, health care is inundated with symptoms and complaints that exceed the limited time capacity of health care professionals. It has been my experience, that mainstream health care is overseen not by the patients’ medical providers but by a larger “all-seeing eye” focused on the bottom line. It isfelt within every procedure, therapy and treatment protocol; –your insurance company. Without having the direct contact or history of the patient these decisions are made. They dictate what seems to me, that which is in the best interest of corporate insurance companies and not in the best interests of the patient. Who knows better than the person who comes into direct contact with the patient, the healthcare provider? With the many and often multiple needs of the patent and a condensed time in which to manage their care, it is a wonder more mistakes aren’t being made. To address a large and ever growing number of people in need we, in the health care field, are overworked and underpaid. It is easy to overlook and by-pass an important piece in the equation in the health care puzzle; individualized quality care.

How did profits become more important than people? In an ever changing world of high finance, opportunity and the push to strive for more. we have created a giant monster. This monster is controlling us and largely dictating how we practice (which is the job of licensing boards.) Practitioners have the wisdom of understanding to know best how to manage what was once compassion in action. Our choice to serve and help others has been tainted by policies and procedures, much of which is not within our own understanding of best practice. The larger umbrella called managed care effects us all; patients and providers alike. In my experience working with insurance companies as a contracted provider, I, like many, in the process of trying to help others, am limited by narrowly defined codes and reimbursements, limiting effectiveness in treating patients with the services they require. This need for treatment sometimes necessitates patients having to go outside of the managed system where they often find a larger dollar amount dangling over their heads. It seems freedom of choice, by most standards has a price tag. Those that can afford choice can exercise this freedom while others can’t due to the oppressive paralysis of inability to choose based on economics.

The other side to managed care is inconsistency. I have heard this from patients time and time again. Individualized attention seems to be lost. It’s been my experience that some patients are bounced around by other practitioners having conflicting advice, different unresolved treatments and they feel the frustration of having to discuss yet again their health history, sometime within the same medical office or organization. Patients want to be heard, treated respectfully and get solid answers. I believe part of the answer lies in patient choice. This ability to choose gets lost within the shuffle and patients feel helpless to change the power of thinking to choose. A proactive patient is an empowered patient. While this may be a threat to some, it is best for the patient to think outside of the box; to be able to consider all options.
The need for private practices is necessary to fill in the gaps of this shuffle. Unfortunately it is becoming harder to find such practices and solo practitioners. Those of us not consumed by a corporate entity have been left to defend our position, holding ground that seems to be shaky at best. Yet perseverance is the human quality of the soul. We can not depart from our humanness.

Copyright 4/21 2011

Andrew Wolfe, LMP

Business owner in private practice

Harmony Licensed Massage Therapy, serving individual health care needs in North

Snohomish County since 1987

www.harmonymassagetherapy.com

“Compassionate care, tough on pain.”

>The Importance of Individualized Health Care by Andrew Wolfe LMP

April 22, 2011

>

Health care these days is a system of managed care. Due to the volume of patients needs, health care is inundated with symptoms and complaints that exceed the limited time capacity of health care professionals. It has been my experience, that mainstream health care is overseen not by the patients’ medical providers but by a larger “all-seeing eye” focused on the bottom line. It is felt within every procedure, therapy and treatment protocol; –your insurance company. Without having the direct contact or history of the patient these decisions are made. They dictate what seems to me, that which is in the best interest of corporate insurance companies and not in the best interests of the patient. Who knows better than the person who comes into direct contact with the patient, the healthcare provider? With the many and often multiple needs of the patent and a condensed time in which to manage their care, it is a wonder more mistakes aren’t being made. To address a large and ever growing number of people in need we, in the health care field, are overworked and underpaid. It is easy to overlook and by-pass an important piece in the equation in the health care puzzle; individualized quality care.
How did profits become more important than people? In an ever changing world of high finance, opportunity and the push to strive for more. we have created a giant monster. This monster is controlling us and largely dictating how we practice (which is the job of licensing boards.) Practitioners have the wisdom of understanding to know best how to manage what was once compassion in action. Our choice to serve and help others has been tainted by policies and procedures, much of which is not within our own understanding of best practice. The larger umbrella called managed care effects us all; patients and providers alike. In my experience working with insurance companies as a contracted provider, I, like many, in the process of trying to help others, am limited by narrowly defined codes and reimbursements, limiting effectiveness in treating patients with the services they require. This need for treatment sometimes necessitates patients having to go outside of the managed system where they often find a larger dollar amount dangling over their heads. It seems freedom of choice, by most standards has a price tag. Those that can afford choice can exercise this freedom while others can’t due to the oppressive paralysis of inability to choose based on economics.
The other side to managed care is inconsistency. I have heard this from patients time and time again. Individualized attention seems to be lost. It’s been my experience that some patients are bounced around by other practitioners having conflicting advice, different unresolved treatments and they feel the frustration of having to discuss yet again their health history, sometime within the same medical office or organization. Patients want to be heard, treated respectfully and get solid answers. I believe part of the answer lies in patient choice. This ability to choose gets lost within the shuffle and patients feel helpless to change the power of thinking to choose. A proactive patient is an empowered patient. While this may be a threat to some, it is best for the patient to think outside of the box; to be able to consider all options.
The need for private practices is necessary to fill in the gaps of this shuffle. Unfortunately it is becoming harder to find such practices and solo practitioners. Those of us not consumed by a corporate entity have been left to defend our position, holding ground that seems to be shaky at best. Yet perseverance is the human quality of the soul. We can not depart from our humanness.

Copyright 4/21 2011
Andrew Wolfe, LMP
Business owner in private practice
Harmony Licensed Massage Therapy, serving individual health care needs in
Snohomish County since 1987

http://www.harmonymassagetherapy.com
“Compassionate care, tough on pain.”